Noise levels in manufacturing can lead to hearing loss

Individuals who work in the manufacturing industry are at risk of suffering from hearing loss because of the loud machinery they use to do their job duties. It’s imperative that employers set safety protocol based on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards.

OSHA requires that anywhere that has an 8-hour time-weighted average of at least 85 decibels have a proper hearing conversation program. Without one in place, workers have an increased chance of suffering permanent injuries to their hearing.

What are some signs that a workplace is too noisy?

There are a few signs that a workplace is above the threshold for having a hearing protection program. One of the easiest ways to determine the noise level is to use a monitor, but not all workplaces have this present. Workers may notice these signs if their workplace is too loud:

  • Needing to shout for someone within an arm’s length to hear you
  • Experiencing a ringing in the ears after work
  • Having trouble hearing after you leave work

If you notice any of these signs and your employer doesn’t have a hearing protection program in place, talking to a supervisor about the issue might be a good idea. 

What are the signs that a person is suffering from hearing loss?

A person who suffers from work-related hearing loss may notice subtle signs that something is amiss. These often appear slowly and might not be easily noticed at first. You may notice that you’re having to ask people to speak louder so you can hear them or that you have to turn the television louder to hear it. Voices and sounds might seem muffled. 

Work-related hearing loss is a serious matter. It’s imperative that you seek out help to preserve your hearing. If the hearing loss has progressed considerably, you may need to apply for workers’ compensation benefits or disability. An experienced advocate can help you pursue all the resources that are available to you.